Tag Archives: okefenokeensis

Baby Greens

Here’s a few up and coming babies of the anthocyanin free flavor. These seedlings were planted earlier this year and will be facing their first dormancy here pretty soon.

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Sarracenia "Green Monster" x alata AF
Sarracenia “Green Monster” x alata AF

Sarracenia wrigleyana AF
Sarracenia wrigleyana AF

Sarracenia catesbaei AF
Sarracenia catesbaei AF

Sarracenia "Green Monster" x minor var. okefenokeensis F2Sarracenia “Green Monster” x minor var. okefenokeensis  – F2
These are a few of the seedlings that exhibit the AF mutation – other seedlings that came out of this batch are non AF. One of the non AF pitchers decided to photobomb this shot and you can see it on the left. It has some red coloration. You can read more about the roots of this particular collaboration breeding project between Jerry Addington, Mike Wang and myself  (as well as see the pod these plants came from) in this blog post. This year I crossed 2 different clones from the original Sarracenia “Green Monster” x minor var. okefenokeensis seedlings and excited to see how those grow out in the coming years.

Young and Green

Here’s some young green (anthocyanin free) plants! There’s still a lot of evolving to do, but so far, so good!

Sarracenia (rubra ssp. jonesii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis) x "Green Monster"
Sarracenia (rubra ssp. jonesii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis)
x “Green Monster”
This AF plant is the result of crossing one AF recessive plant with an anthocyanin free plant. This seedling is the only one that survived the multiple moves. Glad that it was the AF one that survived!

Sarracenia moorei AF
Sarracenia moorei AF

Sarracenia mitchelliana AF x "Green Monster"
Sarracenia mitchelliana AF x “Green Monster”

Sarracenia venosa AF
Sarracenia venosa AF F2

Sarracenia courtii AF x purpurea ssp. venosa AF
Sarracenia courtii AF x purpurea ssp. venosa AF

Sarracenia (purpurea heterophylla x rubra ssp. jonesii) x (leucophylla x rubra ssp. gulfensis ) x "Green Monster"
Sarracenia ((purpurea heterophylla x rubra ssp. jonesii AF) x (leucophylla AF x rubra ssp. gulfensis AF)) x “Green Monster”

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…and here are a few AF recessive babies that should be fun to work with in future breeding projects!

Sarracenia "Green Monster" x rosea "Big Mama"
Sarracenia “Green Monster” x rosea “Big Mama”

Sarracenia "Green Monster" x rosea "Big Mama"
Sarracenia “Green Monster” x rosea “Big Mama”
I think the little seedling that photo-bombed this photo may be S. “Green Monster” – F2. It’s possible that some of pollen from the pod parent may have gotten on the stigma. At this point, it certainly looks that way.

Sarracenia rosea "Big Mama" x venosa AF
Sarracenia rosea “Big Mama” x venosa AF

Sarracenia 'Doodle Bug' OP - Wide Hood x "Green Monster"
Sarracenia ‘Doodle Bug’ OP Hybrid x “Green Monster”

Collaboration Update: S. minor giant x “Green Monster”

Sarracenia minor var. okefenokeensis x "Green Monster" - 1 Sarracenia minor var. okefenokeensis x "Green Monster" - 2 Sarracenia minor var. okefenokeensis x "Green Monster" - 3
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Sarracenia minor var. okefenokeensis x “Green Monster”

Left to right: Clones 1, 2, 3
Cross done in 2009.
These plants are a a result of the collaboration project with Jerry Addington and Mike Wang that I describe here and here.

Up and Coming AF Seedlings

If you know me, you know I can’t get enough of the anthocyanin free plants! Here are a few up and coming green seedlings. Some are a result of breeding with anthocyanin free recessive plants (those plants with that hidden mutation that suppresses anthocyanin production) with other AF plants. Others are just a result of straight AF breeding lines. Fun stuff!

Sarracenia (leucophylla x purpurea heterophylla) x leucophylla AF
Sarracenia (leucophylla x purpurea heterophylla) x leucophylla AF
The parentage of this plant consisted of one AF recessive plant, and one AF plant. One of the surviving seedlings from this cross turned out to be AF, while the other clearly exhibits the presence of anthocyanin.

Sarracenia (rubra ssp. jonesii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis) x "Green Monster"
Sarracenia (rubra ssp. jonesii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis)
x “Green Monster”
The parentage of this cross also consists of one AF recessive parent, and one pure AF plant. I’ve had a couple plants sprout from this batch, but this was the only survivor. I’m glad it turned out to be AF.

Sarracenia mitchelliana AF x "Green Monster"
Sarracenia mitchelliana AF x “Green Monster”
This cross uses pure AF parentage – S. mitchelliana AF and S. “Green Monster” which is another anthocyanin free plant.

Sarracenia moorei - AF
Sarracenia moorei, AF
S. leucophylla AF X S. flava ‘suspicion’
Both parents of this cross are AF resulting in AF progeny.

A Bright Find

Sarracenia (leuco x purpurea heterophylla) x (rubra ssp. jonseii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis)Sarracenia (leucophylla x purpurea heterophylla) 
x (rubra ssp. jonseii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis)
Cross by Jerry Addington

I recently had a bright find. As I was doing some clean up of some young plants recently, I came across something interesting hiding in the fray of last year’s burnt out foliage. The cross is Sarracenia (leucophylla x purpurea heterophylla) x (rubra ssp. jonseii AF x minor var. okefenokeensis) by Jerry Addington. There are 2 young plants in there.

As you probably already know, last year was not kind to the plants at all, and I didn’t get to see any of the real characteristics of the plants come about, so I couldn’t really tell what kind of things I had going on with the younger plants. I’m constantly finding surprises here and there… and I wonder what other things I’ll find as I still go through and trim the dead pitchers away.

The plant on the left still has one sort of decent yet fading pitcher left over from last year. The plant on the right has a new pitcher coming up that has a unique amount of pale cream/white that covers most of the pitcher. Interestingly enough, both parent plants have anthocyanin free recessive genes. I clipped the older pitcher that was all crispy and burnt, but the other burnt out pitcher on this pale plant from last year has a pitcher that looks like it stayed pale with a flush of red. I’m guessing that it will eventually get that red flush to the pitcher. For sure it’s something that I’ll be keeping a watch on.

Minor … Hybrid?

Minor var. okefenokeensis?

Sarracenia minor var. okefenokeensis x 'Golden Red Jubilee'

I grew the above plant from a seed batch that Brooks Garcia did in either 2008 or 2009. He crossed S. minor var. okefenokeensis with S. ‘Golden Red Jubilee’ and most of the plants look similar to the above photo. Only a couple from the batch look like the photo to the left (photo from 2011, a sibling plant) in where you can see just a tad bit more of the influence of S. ‘Golden Red Jubilee’, yet it’s S. minor that dominates the look. The plant above looks to be mostly minor, which leads me to assume that most of the plants could be selfed. I also have to mention that the pitchers in the photo above formed late-late-late fall. (Yes… some plants are confused from all this moving and I fear it could be another year before things settle back down to a more normal routine.) Form and color have held well since then. I’m really looking forward to seeing it flower and at that time will know better if any of the S. ‘Golden Red Jubilee’ genes made their way into this mix. S. minor flowers are yellow, while S. ‘Golden Red Jubilee’ flowers are a dark red/maroon. I am not sure if the above plant will flower this year, but if not – I hope it will next year. Just another example of the pretty awesome surprises you find when growing plants out from seed. I also like the windows that appear on the side and all the way to the front of the pitcher. It could be a useful characteristic in more breeding projects in the future. Anyway, I’ll photograph and update more of the siblings when a new flush of pitchers come up this year.

Homecoming

There’s no place like home. Like I mentioned in my last post, I deeply enjoyed my visit up north (thanks again Mark!), but it feels great to be back home and with the plants again. Below are some photos from my first day back in the Asylum. A few traps here and there… as well as a few blooms, and a few buds that I’m really excited to work with! Enjoy!

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Greenhouse
The Asylum. It’s great to be home. 

Pinguicula Planter
Pinguicula doggy-piggy-bank planter, sending up a bloom!

Sarracenia 'Leah Wilkerson' x minor var. okefenokeensis
Sarracenia ‘Leah Wilkerson’ x minor var. okefenokeensis
Sown last year and growing quickly.

Sarracenia alata x rubra ssp. wherryi, MBRS clone
Sarracenia alata x rubra ssp. wherryi, MBRS clone.

Sarracenia ((rubra x oreophila) x flava v. rugelii) x 'Adrian Slack' - Select Clone
Sarracenia ((rubra x oreophila) x flava v. rugelii) x ‘Adrian Slack’
-Select Clone-
The pitchers from very late last season are still holding color well.

Sarracenia (leucophylla "red" x minor var. okefenokeensis) x (leucophylla x psittacina)
Sarracenia (leucophylla “red” x minor var. okefenokeensis) x (leucophylla x psittacina)  – cross by Dr. Travis H. Wyman.

Sarracenia 'Godzuki' x ((rubra x oreophila) x flava v. rugelii)
S. ‘Godzuki’ x ((rubra x oreophila) x flava v. rugelii)

Sarracenia flava "Heavy Veined"Sarracenia flava “Heavy Veined” flower breaking open.

Sarracenia 'Adrian Slack'
Sarracenia ‘Adrian Slack’
FINALLY, a BUD! After 2 years with no bloom, I finally get one this year!

Hope it survives and actually blooms for me though…

Sarracenia 'Smurf'
Ok, I know. It’s a freak. S. purpurea “Smurf” has a bud.
This should be interesting.

Sarracenia purpurea subsp. venosa var. burkii f. luteolaSarracenia purpurea subsp. venosa var. burkii f. luteola
Got another one with a bud! I wonder if I should cross with the Smurf? Hmm…

Sarracenia 'Reptilian Rose' x leucophylla "Pale" - Clone 1
Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x leucophylla “Pale” – clone 1
Cross by Dr. Travis H. Wyman

Sarracenia 'Reptilian Rose' x leucophylla "Pale" - Clone 7Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x leucophylla “Pale” – clone 7
Cross by Dr. Travis H. Wyman