Tag Archives: North American Pitcher Plant

The Professor

Last week I was in the Washington countryside on a covert operation to surprise a great botanical mentor and friend – Jerry Addington. (I’ll have more details on this surprise in my next blog post. I’m working on it; photos and video to follow!) The day before visiting Jerry, my friend Kinjie and I took a little detour to visit another local grower – “The Professor.” Carnivorous plant class was in session as The Professor, Kinjie, and I were discussing everything from the cultivation, to the genetics of these fascinating plants. This visit was a phenomenal prelude of things to come.

Enjoy a few frames (shot with both DSLR and iPhone) from our visit! Professor – thank you again for your kindness and generosity! Hope to visit again soon. :)

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Class in session with The Professor. 6 Jun 2014.

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6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

6 Jun 2014 - The Professor
6 Jun 2014 - The Professor

Awake Early

Happy Monday all! Most of the plants in the greenhouse are alseep, but there are a couple that are awake. I mean… like dude, sent up pitchers and ready for business! It’s been a funky year last year so things are adjusting in a weird way. I guess. I would gather that the greenhouse environment also contributes to the early risers photographed below. Both are crosses that I’ve done in years past.

Sarracenia (leucophylla x oreophila) x purpurea ssp. venosaSarracenia (leucophylla x oreophila, Oudean Clone) x purpurea ssp. venosa

Sarracenia 'Love Bug' x flava v. rubricorporaSarracenia ‘Love Bug’ x flava v. rubricorpora

Still Decent

It’s been a while since I’ve updated the blog, I know. Things have been good, but pretty busy as of late. I was out doing some work in the greenhouse yesterday and wanted to share photos of some plants that still had some decent looking foliage. During winter, I tend to start to focus on growing other plants now that the Sarracenia are pretty much asleep. I’ll start to focus on things like Nepenthes, Cephalotus, maybe some Drosera as well. And now I’m toying a little bit with Heliamphora. (Like, OMG, Heli’s are SO RAD!) You already know I’ll be updating the blog with photos of these other plants throughout the winter. Hey, you know I gotta keep growing.

Anyway, back to the Sarracenia… I find the crispy old foliage makes for an interesting juxtaposition in the photo. I’ll be going through slicing the old foliage down soon. For now, enjoy a few of the photos!

moorei "Orange Glow" x 'Adrian Slack'
Sarracenia moorei “Orange Glow” x ‘Adrian Slack’

S. (purpurea heterophylla x rubra ssp. jonesii) x (leucophylla x rubra ssp. gulfensis)-1
Sarracenia (purpurea heterophylla x rubra ssp. jonesii) x (leucophylla x rubra ssp. gulfensis) – Anthocyanin Free Clone

Sarracenia "John Rizzi" x 'Judith Hindle'
Sarracenia “John Rizzi” x ‘Judith Hindle’

Sarracenia 'Hurricane Creek White' x 'Adrian Slack'
Sarracenia leucophylla ‘Hurricane Creek White’ x ‘Adrian Slack’
Young Plant

AF formosa-1-2
Sarracenia formosa, Anthocyanin Free Clone

Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)

Here’s some S. ‘Reptilian Rose’ hybrid diversity for your enjoyment! Below are just a few of the siblings from the same pod of S. ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla). This cross was done by Dr. Travis H. Wyman. You can see some of the S. ‘Reptilian Rose’ characteristics showing up in the progeny.  S. ‘Reptilian Rose’ (created by Phil Faulisi) is one of my favorite plants because of that jagged nectar roll and also the sweet rose-scent it emits. That angular nectar roll characteristic has transferred onto some of the offspring. Other crosses display more of the influence of the pollen parent plant, a moorei. They didn’t get a chance to develop as much as I would of liked this year because of those low light levels earlier, but I am looking forward to comparing their growth next season. Below are only a few of the crosses, but again it illustrates the rich and great diversity contained within a seed pod.

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Sarracenia 'Reptililan Rose' x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)
Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)

Sarracenia 'Reptililan Rose' x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)

Sarracenia 'Reptililan Rose' x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)

Sarracenia 'Reptililan Rose' x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)
Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)

Sarracenia 'Reptililan Rose' x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava v. rubricorpora x leucophylla)

Sarracenia leucophylla – Franklin Co., FL – A x B

Sarracenia lecuophyllaSarracenia leucophylla
Franklin Co., FL – Clone A x Clone B
Cross by Wes Buckner