Tag Archives: Heliamphora

CHOMP!

Recently my family and I visited the SF Conservatory of Flowers and got a chance to see the Chomp! exhibit. If you ever find yourself in the area, I highly recommend stopping by and immersing yourself in the beauty that is the SF Conservatory of Flowers. Below is a slide show featuring a few shots from around the conservatory, as well as a few highlight shots from the exhibit. Chomp! runs from 11 Apr 2014 – 19 Oct 2014 so be sure and visit soon! (And in case you didn’t already know – plants in the exhibit are from none other than California Carnivores… sweet!)

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SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

SF Conservatory of Flowers

Heliamphora heterodoxa x minor

Heliamphora heterodoxa x minorHeliamphora heterodoxa x minor

Heliamphora Divisions

Heliamphora divisionsHeliamphora divisions

One of the awesome and dangerous things about being in this greenhouse, especially in the winter, is that I’m able to try my hand at new things. I’ve only begun to play around with Heliamphora, and so far so good! I mean, I’ve had one for a few years, and it did (and is still) doing well. But yeah, more pitcher goodness for me to play with now! I recently got the itch to break things apart and… I did. (See the photo above.) Heliamphora seem quite brittle when compared to Sarracenia. With the Sarracenia, I would just break and tear rhizomes up like a Karraayyzzayyy hungry honey-badger. When I was splitting the Heliamphora apart, quite a few sections of plant just kind of fell apart without having any root attached. DOH! So I just stuck that rootless piece of greenery it in some media anyway. The media that I’m using is just a lighter mixture of long fiber sphagnum, peat moss, and perlite.

I was a bit worried and asked around if other Heliamphora growers have had success in propagating Heliamphora this way. Turns out that many folks have! Check out this article by João Roberto Gabbardo on the International Carnivorous Plant Society site. Very cool! Well, the humidity in the dome is high enough that I don’t really have to worry too much about it, but I threw a large Tupperware bin over them anyway to keep the humidity up. It doesn’t get that hot either under the dome as I have shade cloth that keeps things cool. I’ll keep that Tupperware bin for a while until I see the new growth really take off. Others have had success by bagging the pot (covering in a plastic bag) and placing it in a cool yet bright location. Heliamphoras are awesome. All this is new for me and I look forward to sharing my Heliamphora adventures with you all!

Quick Update

Hey everyone! I know it’s been a while since I’ve posted! Hope y’all been well! Honestly I haven’t been down to the greenhouse much recently just because things have been kinda busy. It’s all good. The plants are dormant or about to hit dormancy anyway. There’s still a few plants that look okay here and there, such as a few of the leucos and their hybrids – but for the most part the sleep has begun. I am still doing a lot of cleaning and organizing, and will be continually doing so throughout the course of the winter. I’ll probably bust the katana blade out later to do some slicing of old foliage… that should be fun.

During this time period, I keep the Sarracenia on the dryish side – not watering as much or as frequently. I just make sure that their soil is still moist/damp, but I don’t leave them constantly sitting in water as I would during active growth.

The cool thing is that the Nepenthes are sending out pitchers, so I’ll share a few photos of those in upcoming posts. I am also seeing pitchers grow and open up on the Cephalotus, as well as the Heliamphora. I will share those in a bit. For now here are a few photos of how things are goin’ in the Asylum.

Dormancy approcachesPlants starting to go dormant. Again, I’m leaving most of the old long foliage on there and still letting plants get that light they have missed out on.

Young Sarracenia TableYes, I know it looks messy. These are young plants I am still growing out. Again, you can see the long and stretched foliage.

Nepenthes HouseThe Nepenthes are doing well and loving their dome!

Sphagnum mossIt doesn’t look like much, but I’m growing out some sphagnum moss. I basically took a pot of sphagnum and just tore it up and am growing them in trays.

AF TableHere’s the anthocyanin free section. You can see the older leaves browning up. I’m looking forward to watching this table grow out next year!

A Visit to California Carnivores

Last weekend, Dahlia and I had a little weekend excursion in Sonoma County. It was a much needed time to relax after all the moving that we recently had to do. We’re settling into our new place nicely – but man… moving always sucks! (Thanks again to everyone who helped out!)

So anyway – what would a mini-vacay be without carnivores?! For me, vacations are never complete without carnivorous plant goodness. Since we were in the ‘hood of California Carnivores we decided to stop by to immerse ourselves in the carnivory. If you haven’t been there, I highly recommend stopping by. It’s always a pleasure to visit this magnificent and magical place. Thank you, Cal Carn for what you do. Continue to embolden and equip us to be better growers!

Click here for the full screen slideshow!

A few highlight photos are below the slideshow.

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A Visit to California Carnivores