Tag Archives: growing from seed

Fill ‘er Up

My new project: Fill ‘er up.
I’ll be starting a few seedlings yet again. I know, I’m a little behind, for this year.
I got two tubs and a few square pots. This is going to be a fun undertaking. For now, here is the blank canvas on which this carnivorous art work will soon begin…

I’ll keep you posted as things fill up and (hopefully) grow.


[One of the seedling tubs, soon to be full of baby Sarracenia]


[The Matrix... empty pots for now, soon to be filled with Sarracenia goodness.]

Some Nice Surprises

Salutations,
Man, it’s been pretty busy – I would imagine this is so for ALL of us in this holiday season.   My cube day job especially has been pretty busy -  resulting in my recent silence here on the blog.  Honestly, I’d rather NOT have these mini hiatuses but would rather share Sarracenia goodness with everyone. All day. Every day.   These past couple of weeks have  most certainly has been quite the flurry of activity.

Anyway, I just wanted to say a very special thank you to fellow blogger James at Lost in the Landscape!  (If you haven’t done so, check his blog!) He had sent me a few things that really added some awesomeness in my not-so awesome past couple of weeks…  (Thanks James, you ROCK!)

[Some seeds that will have some star potential!  It may not look like much now, but I wanted to start documenting their growth.  A couple years later I'll probably refer back to this post just to show how these plants started.]


[Sarracenia division, unconfirmed ID at this point, but we're pretty sure that it is a S. 'Judith Hindle']

Surprise
[I'm really excited about this one- Seedlings of S. x melanorhoda, Triffid Park x purpurea ssp. veonsa v. burkii f. luteola. Yes! I will be using these for breeding in the anthocyanin free line. They have that recessive antho free gene in them now!]

[I potted them up a couple of nights ago right when I got home.  It was about 10pm, and dark and cold out, but I still did it! Brrr!]

**Thanks again James!**

Hybrid Update: S. courtii x "Green Monster", Anthocyanin free clone

Hope everyone is having a great weekend so far!  Here’s an update of a hybrid that I created in 2009.  Looking forward to what the mature adult plants will be like — and not only because I think both of the parent plants are pretty FRESH, but they are also anothcyanin free, and  I flippin’ love love LOVE anthocyanin free plants.  Again, when a plant is anthocyanin free (or “AF” for shorthand) there is no pigment/coloration in it.   I guess you can say it’s equivalent to albino-ness.

[Meet the parents]

[Left: S. courtii, AF | Right: S. "Green Monster". (S. excellens, AF)]

[S. courtii x "Green Monster", September 28, 2010]

Sarracenia courtii x "Green Monster"[S. courtii x "Green Monster", November 13, 2010]

And the two of the strongest seedlings were separated and are lookin’ pretty good thus far.

Sarracenia courtii x "Green Monster", Anthocyain Free[S. courtii x "Green Monster", November 13, 2010]

Sarracenia courtii x "Green Monster", Anthocyain Free[S. courtii x "Green Monster", November 13, 2010]

Down with O.P.P.

Yo, so who’s down with OPP? (Yeah, you know me!) I’m not talking about the song by “Naughty by Nature” – I’m talking plants.
*Open Pollinated Plants. * Dude. I just had a 1991 moment. HA!

Anyway, OPP’s can be interesting. Today’s OPP feature is one I grew from seed from a few years ago. The parent plant is Sarracenia ‘Doodle Bug’ but as far as the pollen parent, ehhh…. who knows, hence the OP designation.  It’s a sibling to this wide-ish-thing  plant I wrote about earlier.   Yeah, I’m down with O.P.P.

Doodle Bug, OP[Sarracenia 'Doodle Bug' OP, Photo taken 11/13/2010]

Off Season Bloomin'

It is not all that uncommon for Sarracenia to bloom during the fall.  It happens. Why exactly they do this now, I am not too sure.  Some speculate it’s the similar lighting/environmental conditions as spring. The buds are shorter now in the fall, and I also believe that the flowers are not fertile (?) but, I have yet to try and pollinate in the fall. Who knows. I typically just cut off the flower during this time to allow the plant to conserve it’s energy for dormancy.  At times I just let it do its thing. Whatever.

[Out of season flower bud. Photo taken October 31, 2010]

 

What I did find very awesome and very recently — one of my older 2 year old hybrids DID bloom recently.  This is significant because it’s the first flower of a hybrid that I created. Blooming within 2 growing seasons!  A bit weird that it did bloom for me now.  And not a short bloom, but rather, a tall spring like bloom. Woah dude. I did a cross of  Sarracenia ‘White Sparkler’ x (‘Ladies in Waiting’ x ‘Judith Hindle’) in 2008.  The latter pollen parent is a very rich colored plant, and I hope that the coloration carries over to the progeny.  The photo below is of a young pitcher later in the season. I’m getting a lot of color variation in this batch of seedlings. Some are deeper red, some like the below resemble the pod parent moreso.  I want to see what this seedling batch does next season in terms of color and vigor.

 

[A hybrid I crossed in spring of 2008: Sarracenia 'White Sparkler' x ('Ladies in Waiting' x 'Judith Hindle').  Photo taken November 6, 2010.]

 

[The flower.  Sarracenia 'White Sparkler' x ('Ladies in Waiting' x 'Judith Hindle'). Photo taken November 6, 2010]