Flowers

Here’s a small sampling of early buds and bloomers. Many more blooms are on their way which means many more potential crosses to make into a reality.

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Sarracenia alataSarracenia alata

Sarracenia alata - TX
Sarracenia alata – Texas

Sarracenia alata - Covington Co., MS(?)
Sarracenia alata – Covington Co.
(Sorry, I am unsure as to which state. MS or AL…)*
2 Mar 2015 Update: Thanks to feedback from Randy Troup it is of high probability that this S. alata is from Covington Co., MS.  Thank you for the insight, Randy!

Sarracenia oreophila
Sarracenia oreophila

Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora
Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora

Sarracenia 'Adrian Slack'
Sarracenia ‘Adrian Slack’

Sarracenia flava AF - Colquitt Co., GA
Sarracenia flava – Anthocyanin Free – Colquitt Co., GA

Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava var. rubricorpora x leucophylla) – Clone 9
Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava var. rubricorpora x leucophylla) – Clone 9

Sarracenia 'Legacy'
Sarracenia ‘Legacy’

White Cephalotus Pitcher?!

One of my cephalotus has been behaving a little… well, different. I guess it just felt like putting out this really bright white pitcher! I did some Google-ing and apparently it does happen every now and then. I don’t really know what causes it. The pitcher doesn’t appear to be dying as it’s not looking withered or anything. It’s been inflating and is now starting to open up. My guess is that it may get some more color on it later on – as in maybe a redish peristome? I’ll just keep a watch over it and hope it doesn’t die on me!

White CephalotusThe pitcher on the left was recently produced – and it is a division from the plant on the right. The plant on the left has a ghostly pale pitcher that just came outta nowhere! Both have been growing in my grow tank for the past few months, and both get the same amount of light. The one on the left has non-carnivorous leaves that are green, as well as some green little pitchers too. Then that thing just happened. Hmmpff… Go home Cephalotus, you are drunk!

White Cephalotus
Cephalotus follicularis – white pitcher

White CephalotusCephalotus follicularis – white pitcher

Fabulous February

February, so far, is looking pretty fab. Thanks to the warm January, much of the crop has been moving at a very fast speed. There are plenty of buds to be found all over the place, a few open pitchers, and… seeds germinating! Enjoy a few snapshots from the past couple of weeks.

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Sarracenia SeedsThe seeds (from 2013!!) have been sown! Yes, you read that right. These have been sitting in cold stratification for a year. A couple of weeks ago, my wife and the kiddos helped pot up all 202+ crosses. It was an extremely busy year for me last year and by the time I was ready to put them down, the year was half way over. I didn’t want to use supplemental lighting as with this many seeds, as that electric bill would just be nuts. Now that I finally have a little more space, I was able to finally put these down.

Sarracenia purpurea heterophylla x leucophylla "Red"And guess what? Many pots have seeds that have are sprouting! Exciting! The one in the photo is S. purpurea heterophylla x leucophylla “Red” – these came from Jerry Addington and should produce a brilliant crop of anthocyanin free recessive plants to work with in the future.

The AsylumThe Asylum. Check out the Sarracenia alata flowers already opening up! And check out that other half of the greenhouse that needs trimming! Heh!

Sarracenia alataSarracenia alata flower

Sarracenia rosea - Baldwin Co., ALSarracenia rosea – Baldwin Co., AL in flower.

Sarracenia alataA few more Sarracenia alata buds about to pop!

Sarracenia 'Alucard' x 'Adrian Slack'One of my crosses from a maybe 3 or so years ago. This is S. ‘Alucard’ x ‘Adrian Slack’ glowing with the sun hitting it from behind. Notice one of last year’s autumn pitchers compared to this year’s larger spring pitcher. What a jump! You can see tell-tale signs of what the plant would be like from last year’s pitcher. However, with this year’s pitcher, you can see much more character shine through! The unknown of what comes out of the cross and how that plant matures is part of the excitement that comes with growing from seed. Anyway, I’ll post another photo later on so you can get a better view of this year’s most recent pitcher from this cross.

Sarracenia 'Reptilian Rose' x (flava var. rubricorpora x leucophylla) - Clone 14Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava var. rubricorpora x leucophylla) – Clone 14. New pitcher coloring up against last year’s wreckage. Cross by Dr. Travis H. Wyman.

Sarracenia 'Reptilian Rose' x (flava var. rubricorpora x leucophylla) - Clone 9Sarracenia ‘Reptilian Rose’ x (flava var. rubricorpora x leucophylla) – Clone 9
Cross by Dr. Travis H. Wyman

Sarracenia (leucophylla "Purple Lips" x flava var. rubricorpora) x 'Adrian Slack'Another one of my crosses – Sarracenia leucophylla “Purple Lips” x flava var. rubricorpora x ‘Adrian Slack’ – new pitcher opening up! 

Sarracenia oreophilaSarracenia oreophila, awake and ready to devour insects!

Sarracenia oreophilaSarracenia oreophila

Sarracenia alata - AFSarracenia alata – Anthocyanin Free!
A new pitcher stands out against last year’s crispy dead pitchers.

Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora x flava 'Suspicion'Young pitchers stretch towards the sky. Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora x flava ‘Suspicion’ – an anthocyanin free recessive cross. This cross was done by Aidan Selwyn. I hope to use these AF recessive S. flava plants in future (anthocyanin free) crosses.

Sarracenia flava - AF - Colquitt Co., GAOk, ok, ok… I’m totally geeking out here. This is a flower bud of an anthocyanin free form of S. flava – Colquitt Co., GA. YEAH. You know what this means… :)

Predatory Plants!

This last weekend, I had the privilege of visiting Josh Brown – owner of Predatory Plants and Bay Area Carnivorous Plant Society president! If you want to add some great plants to your collection, be sure to visit Josh’s store: Predatory Plants. He has a fantastic collection and I couldn’t help but just be mesmerized by all of that carnivorous botanical wonder at his place. Enjoy the slideshow as well as a few highlight snapshots down below!

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View slideshow fullscreen

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Predatory Plants

Josh – thanks for the tour and for sharing your amazing collection with me. Keep up the brilliant work… by the way – now I want to grow ant plants! :)

Nepenthes robcantleyi in UV Light

As seen in this previous post, my young Nepenthes robcantleyi has finally put out a decent pitcher in the new tank conditions. It’s been a while since I last tinkered around with the 254nm short wave UV light as seen with the Red Queen here, and some other Nepenthes here; so I wanted to try it out with this new pitcher. I ran a 90 second exposure to really get the glow to show. The resulting shot was hauntingly beautiful.


Nepenthes robcantleyi under 254nm UV Light.
90 second exposure, f 9.0, 50mm. Mouse over to see the plant in normal light.